Personal Finance Blog Dividends Cocktails Bar Recipe Cocktail Culture

*Off Topic* The Pink Lady

My sister was recently in town, and said she wanted me to make her a drink.

“Something sweet” she said.

I knew she liked Gin, and I had recently been experimenting with egg whites in my drinks, so I thought the “Pink Lady” would be the perfect drink to try.

Ingredients:

2 oz Gin (I used Tanqueray)

0.75oz Grenadine

1 Egg White

 

Directions:

  1. Add all ingredients into cocktail shaker and dry shake.
  2. Add Ice, shake again
  3. Fine Strain into coupe

Result:

It was VERY sweet – tasted like candy(and gin).  It was definitely tasty – but a little too sweet for my liking.  My wife, sister, and one of my sister’s friends all really liked it – so perhaps it’s the perfect drink for the ladies.

 

Personal Finance Blog Dividends Cocktails Bar Recipe Cocktail Culture

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Dividend Growth Blog Personal Finance Investing Winnipeg Jordan Maas

February Update: Breaking Records, New Purchases & More

Another month has come and gone – which means time for the monthly update post!

Personal Highlights for February:

  • Finished reading “Predictably Irrational” by Dan Ariely.  Was a pretty interesting read – and reminded me of one of my favourite books “Thinking fast & slow”.  Currently looking for book recommendations on what to start next.  In the mean time I am flipping through “Warren Buffet & the Interpretation of Financial Statements” which I had read a long time ago.
  • I was able to write 5 new blog posts in February.
  • I reserved my Winnipeg Jet Playoff tickets.  These tickets will end up costing me between $300-$3500 depending how far they go which makes me both happy and frustrated at the same time..hah
  • Started watching “Peaky Blinders” on Netflix.  So far so I like it.
  • Found a home day care for BOTH kids – which will be able to take them by May 1st so Amber can go back to work once her maternity leave ends….and the best part – it’s 5 minutes from my house!
  • Last month I had over 1000 visitors to the blog (which was a new record).  This month I smashed that record:

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  • I had over 1300 visitors this month!  Thanks for stopping by and reading/leaving comments.

Financial Highlights for February:

  • February was the first full month since I transferred all my RBC Mutual funds into my Direct Investing account.
  • I updated my portfolio page to make my holdings a little easier to read.
  • Started preparing my taxes.
  • Continued bi weekly payments into RRSPs & Spousal RSP.
  • Made $1250 from selling some memorabilia that was just sitting in my closet.  You can read more about that here
  • Made 2 new stock purchases in my TFSA.  Added to my position in Algonquin Power & opened a position in Interrent REIT.  You can read about my most recent purchase HERE
  • My overall portfolio value went down for the first time in 6 months due to the volatility in the market, however as things leveled out it finished the month down just -1.07%.

 

Passive Income Update For February 2018.

TFSA’S:

Diversified Royalty: $9.10 (Dripped 2 new shares)

Artis Reit: $50.13! First time breaking $50 (Dripped 3 shares)

Plaza Reit: $25.75 (Dripped 6 shares)

Chorus Aviation: $10.84 (Dripped 1 share)

TFSA’s Total: $95.82  

RRSP:

Canadian Equity Income Distribution: $242.88

Total Passive Income January 2018:  $338.70 

 

Portfolio Update:

My portfolio decreased by 1.07% month over month.  This is first time my portfolio has decreased in 6 months. The early retirement portfolio now sits at $303,31.11.

Dividends grew by $48.67 vs last February(year over year growth of 16%).

Although February wasn’t a great month for dividend income, I expect to see huge improvements vs last year( mostly due to my funds being switched to direct investing).

Current Watch List:

Andrew Peller: ADW

Cascades: CAS

InterRent Reit: IIP

Northview Apartment Reit: NVU

Caledonia Mining: CAL

My Watchlist hasn’t changed from last month, but I did initiate a position in InterRent Reit.

 

That’s it!  Hope everyone else had a great February – and if you have any book recommendations let me know!!

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New Purchase..and the one that got away(for now)

About 3-4 years ago, I had my eye on a stock – a Residential Reit that kept showing up on all my stock screens.  Unfortunately I never pulled the trigger.  That stock was Northview Apartment Reit – and at the time it was trading around $14.00/share.  Today it is trading at $24 (and would have been paying me a juicy 7%+ dividend on cost for the last 3 years as well.

Truth be told – Northview is still a great stock, and trading at a great price, and one day I may initiate a position – but today is not that day.  For now Northview is still the one that got away….

I did learn my lesson though – and I won’t let another great stock get away!

For the last 6+ months, every time I ran a custom stock screen – another company kept coming up.  It trades at a very low multiple, has a reasonable payout ratio, pays a solid & more importantly SAFE dividend and a growing revenue/NOI.  In a lot of ways it reminds me of Northview REIT.

The company: Interrent Reit

About Interrent (From their website):
InterRent REIT is a growth-oriented real estate investment trust engaged in increasing Unitholder value and creating a growing and sustainable distribution through the acquisition and ownership of multi-residential properties.  

A few highlights from their most recent news release:

  • Gross rental revenue for the year increased by 9.0%, or $9.0 million, to $108.5 million.
  • Gross rental revenue from stabilized operations for the year increased by 4.4%, or $3.5 million, to $83.0 million.
  • Occupancy up in 2017 to 98.4%
  • NOI margin for the year was 60.7%.
  • AFFO per fully diluted unit for the year was $0.374, an increase of 11.0% over 2016.
  • AFFO Payout ratio decreased 3% over the year to 65.8%

Aside from all the fundamentals looking strong – it also fits into a category I was looking to get some exposure to (Residential REIT’s).  I already own Plaza & Artis, so it was a natural fit.

Unfortunately I didn’t have much capital to deploy so I was only able to pick up 103 shares.  This purchase will add $2.31 to my monthly income.

I plan to add to my position over the next few months – until I am able to fully drip a share each month.  At the current stock price & dividend , this means I need to acquire another 340 shares or so.

What do you think of this purchase/stock? Do you own it?  Let me know!

 

 

 

 

 

 

RBC Dividend Growth Investing INvestment blog winnipeg canada

F*#K You RBC! You are the WORST – And why you should buy their stock. *Warning Vulgar Language*

I have had an RBC bank account since I was about 8 years old.  My parents signed me up with the Leo Lion Savings account.  I will be turning 35 this year – and have added the following RBC products over the years:

  • RBC Visa
  • RBC Mutual Funds
  • RBC Line of Credit
  • TFSA Via RBA
  • Direct Investing
  • RESP
  • Spousal RSP
  • Joint Account with Wife

In the last 12 months, RBC has fucked me over more times than I can count.  Here are a few examples:

Example 1:
I had a $40,000 line of credit with a very good interest rate.  I usually didn’t carry a balance on this – however every now and then I would use it to invest if there was a stock I really wanted to buy – but didn’t have the cash on hand.  When we recently purchased our new house – the lender giving us the mortgage wanted us to pay off the line of credit before approving us- so my lawyer sent a letter & Cheque to RBC saying part of the proceeds of my house sale should pay down the L.O.C to zero.  RBC not only paid off the Line of Credit – they also closed it altogether (without telling me).  To make matters worse, at my next appointment RBC told me they had a special offer for me.  Can you guess what it was?  A $10,000 line of credit with a higher interest rate.

Example 2:

I had previously set up opened a Direct Investing Account for my wife as well as a TFSA & Spousal RRSP.  I made sure to ensure I had trading authority on her accounts (as she has no interest in any of this).  I recently redeemed some of my RBC rewards for $650 that I could deposit into a RRSP.   I set up an appointment at the branch to make the deposit into my spousal RRSP.  The guy at the branch said no problem – but that he wasn’t licensed to sell that fund so we would have to call the head office and do it over the phone. (Annoying – but no big deal).  After waiting on hold for a few minutes, the guy from head office said I couldn’t deposit this into the spousal RRSP without speaking to my wife (who wasn’t with me).  I explained I had trading authority and even gave him the password they had set me up with for instances just like this.  Again – he said I couldn’t deposit this into her spousal RRSP without her first reviewing the fund facts as it is a 100% equity fund.  I explained we JUST opened this spousal RRSP a few months prior, she had signed off on the fund facts, it fit her risk profile AND I HAD TRADING AUTHORITY anyway….  Still – it wasn’t good enough for this guy – and finally I had enough/gave up and decided to just deposit it into my RRSP.

***This is where it gets really interesting***

Example 3:

After finally giving up – I told the guy at the bank to just put the funds into my RRSP in one of the funds I already own (Canadian Equity Income Fund).  I watched him type “Canadian Equity Fund”.  I see this and say – “just to confirm this is the equity INCOME fund- not the Equity Fund right?  He assures me – that yes- it will go into the fund I already own.  A few days pass and I log into my online banking only to find I now own $650 of a new fund (Canadian Equity Fund).

Dividends Investing RBC Personal Finance Blog Canada Winnipeg Jordan Maas

 

So now I am on the phone with head office – trying to fix the situation – I just need to  transfer all the funds out of the Canadian Equity fund and into the Canadian Equity Income fund.  To his credit – the guy on the phone was very understanding and did this right away.  So I assumed (BAD IDEA) this guy was competent and could help me with something else.  I decided I wanted to reduce my bi weekly contributions into my RRSP and put the difference into the spousal RRSP instead since my account was quite a bit larger than my wife’s.  I have done this on the phone before – so figured it would be no big deal (BIG MISTAKE).  The guy tells me I can’t increase my contributions into Amber’s account because by doing so it means too high a % of her account will be in equities.  Here is the kicker.  She only has 1 fund which is already 100% equities.  All I was trying to do was to increase the bi weekly contribution to this account.  I tried explaining to this guy that whether you put 1 dollar or 100 dollars into the fund- it is still the EXACT same % …but he somehow couldn’t grasp this.  At this point I am seeing red.  I was ready to lose it.  I tell him forget it – and I am just going to close down all my RBC accounts.

.RBC Dividend Growth Investing INvestment blog winnipeg canada

After a day or two of deciding how I was going to stick it to RBC for Fuckin’ with me – I started thinking about all the things i would need to do to actually make this happen:

  • Get a new bank account
  • Set up Direct deposit with my employer
  • Close out mutual funds, transfer RRSPs, get a new brokerage
  • Cancel all the accounts I just set up for my wife
  • Contact my cell phone, internet, mortgage, insurance companies, and more and get them to switch everything over.

In the end, I decided I really didn’t want to go through all that – hell that would take even more time – and surely I’d become even more frustrated with some of those companies along the way – Plus who is to say a new bank would be any better?

And this is why I believe RBC (or any major Canadian bank) is a great stock to buy.  What other company/industry would I be willing to put up with so much shit – only to end up saying “Awww, fuck it – it’s not THAT bad”.

If that anecdotal evidence isn’t enough to convince you RBC would be a good buy – these results just came in today:

  • RBC reported net income of C$3 billion this quarter ($2.4 billion), up 7 percent.
  • RBC reported net income of C$3 billion this quarter ($2.4 billion), up 7 percent.
  • RBC increased its dividend 3 cents to .94 per quarter
  • After adjustments, Canada’s biggest lender by market capitalization earned $2.05 per diluted share, beating the $1.99 expected by analysts surveyed by Thomson Reuters.

Sorry for the long rant – but I figure if RBC is going to bend us over so much – we may as well at least get them to pay us back in dividends & strong capital gains.

*To my credit – I DID close down all my mutual funds, and move everything to Direct Investing – which will result in me saving about $2000 in fees I would have paid to RBC.

That’ll show em 😛

 

 

 

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Does this count as a side hustle? Also I made a *New Purchase*

I see a lot of personal finance bloggers talk about side hustles. This is just a “cool” way to say make some extra cash on the side.  People do all sorts of things (monetize their blogs, complete surveys, drive Uber, rent out their home on AirBnB, etc.  I don’t really have the desire or time right now to worry about anything like that – however one thing I can get behind is getting rid of the clutter in my house and selling some of the things I’ve accumulated over the years that I really have no need for.

I’ve always been somewhat of a collector, everything from comics, to hockey cards, to coins, and memorabilia.  I realized I have a lot of sports memorabilia, and now that we moved I am not sure if I will ever hang any of it up.  At our old place I had the basement walls full of things – however we recently moved and the rec room in the new house doesn’t really suit a “man cave”.  One day I may redo the basement into a bit of a man cave – but probably not…so in the meantime I have a few cool items that are just collecting dust.  I decided to list one of my more unique pieces for sale since it was literally sitting a closet collecting dust.  It was a game worn NHL All star Jersey which I had won in a sports auction by our local team.  The team said the prize was valued at $2700 although I knew i wouldn’t get that.  I listed it on Kijiji and a Facebook group and within 3 days had about 10 offers.  I finally ended up settling on an offer for $1250 to a local collector.

Here is a picture of me wearing the Jersey the day I won it:

Winnipeg Jets Side Hustle personal finance winnipeg dividends investing blog

I felt a little bad about losing the jersey – but thought to myself in the 3 years that I’ve had it – I’ve probably looked at it 5 times.  In the end – I am really happy with the decision and the next day I transferred the proceeds into my TFSA and made a new purchase!

I was debating between the following stocks: (all which have been on my watchlist for some time)

Andrew Peller, Cascades, Interrent Reit, Northview Apartment Reit, Caledonia Mining.

I looked at each of them again today – but ended up deciding against all of them (mainly due to the fact I wouldn’t have enough to drip a full share of any of them).  I decided to start looking at some of my current holdings to see if any were at a price I felt comfortable adding to (and would put me in a position to drip more shares).  I eventually narrowed it down to Western Forest, Algonquin Power & Power Corp of Canada.

In the end I settled on ol’ faithful Algonquin Power.  I was able to add 98 shares – which means I should now drip 10 full shares each quarter.  This purchase will add $57.10 to my annual dividend income (based on the current exchange rate).

I am not sure if or when I will list anything else for sale – but it definitely feels good to get something out of the house that we weren’t using and be able to to put the proceeds to work for us.

PS — Happy valentine’s day.  Go get laid!