Dividend Growth Blog Personal Finance Investing Winnipeg Jordan Maas

February Update: Breaking Records, New Purchases & More

Another month has come and gone – which means time for the monthly update post!

Personal Highlights for February:

  • Finished reading “Predictably Irrational” by Dan Ariely.  Was a pretty interesting read – and reminded me of one of my favourite books “Thinking fast & slow”.  Currently looking for book recommendations on what to start next.  In the mean time I am flipping through “Warren Buffet & the Interpretation of Financial Statements” which I had read a long time ago.
  • I was able to write 5 new blog posts in February.
  • I reserved my Winnipeg Jet Playoff tickets.  These tickets will end up costing me between $300-$3500 depending how far they go which makes me both happy and frustrated at the same time..hah
  • Started watching “Peaky Blinders” on Netflix.  So far so I like it.
  • Found a home day care for BOTH kids – which will be able to take them by May 1st so Amber can go back to work once her maternity leave ends….and the best part – it’s 5 minutes from my house!
  • Last month I had over 1000 visitors to the blog (which was a new record).  This month I smashed that record:

Personal Finance Blog dividend Growth Canada

  • I had over 1300 visitors this month!  Thanks for stopping by and reading/leaving comments.

Financial Highlights for February:

  • February was the first full month since I transferred all my RBC Mutual funds into my Direct Investing account.
  • I updated my portfolio page to make my holdings a little easier to read.
  • Started preparing my taxes.
  • Continued bi weekly payments into RRSPs & Spousal RSP.
  • Made $1250 from selling some memorabilia that was just sitting in my closet.  You can read more about that here
  • Made 2 new stock purchases in my TFSA.  Added to my position in Algonquin Power & opened a position in Interrent REIT.  You can read about my most recent purchase HERE
  • My overall portfolio value went down for the first time in 6 months due to the volatility in the market, however as things leveled out it finished the month down just -1.07%.

 

Passive Income Update For February 2018.

TFSA’S:

Diversified Royalty: $9.10 (Dripped 2 new shares)

Artis Reit: $50.13! First time breaking $50 (Dripped 3 shares)

Plaza Reit: $25.75 (Dripped 6 shares)

Chorus Aviation: $10.84 (Dripped 1 share)

TFSA’s Total: $95.82  

RRSP:

Canadian Equity Income Distribution: $242.88

Total Passive Income January 2018:  $338.70 

 

Portfolio Update:

My portfolio decreased by 1.07% month over month.  This is first time my portfolio has decreased in 6 months. The early retirement portfolio now sits at $303,31.11.

Dividends grew by $48.67 vs last February(year over year growth of 16%).

Although February wasn’t a great month for dividend income, I expect to see huge improvements vs last year( mostly due to my funds being switched to direct investing).

Current Watch List:

Andrew Peller: ADW

Cascades: CAS

InterRent Reit: IIP

Northview Apartment Reit: NVU

Caledonia Mining: CAL

My Watchlist hasn’t changed from last month, but I did initiate a position in InterRent Reit.

 

That’s it!  Hope everyone else had a great February – and if you have any book recommendations let me know!!

Advertisements
RBC Dividend Growth Investing INvestment blog winnipeg canada

F*#K You RBC! You are the WORST – And why you should buy their stock. *Warning Vulgar Language*

I have had an RBC bank account since I was about 8 years old.  My parents signed me up with the Leo Lion Savings account.  I will be turning 35 this year – and have added the following RBC products over the years:

  • RBC Visa
  • RBC Mutual Funds
  • RBC Line of Credit
  • TFSA Via RBA
  • Direct Investing
  • RESP
  • Spousal RSP
  • Joint Account with Wife

In the last 12 months, RBC has fucked me over more times than I can count.  Here are a few examples:

Example 1:
I had a $40,000 line of credit with a very good interest rate.  I usually didn’t carry a balance on this – however every now and then I would use it to invest if there was a stock I really wanted to buy – but didn’t have the cash on hand.  When we recently purchased our new house – the lender giving us the mortgage wanted us to pay off the line of credit before approving us- so my lawyer sent a letter & Cheque to RBC saying part of the proceeds of my house sale should pay down the L.O.C to zero.  RBC not only paid off the Line of Credit – they also closed it altogether (without telling me).  To make matters worse, at my next appointment RBC told me they had a special offer for me.  Can you guess what it was?  A $10,000 line of credit with a higher interest rate.

Example 2:

I had previously set up opened a Direct Investing Account for my wife as well as a TFSA & Spousal RRSP.  I made sure to ensure I had trading authority on her accounts (as she has no interest in any of this).  I recently redeemed some of my RBC rewards for $650 that I could deposit into a RRSP.   I set up an appointment at the branch to make the deposit into my spousal RRSP.  The guy at the branch said no problem – but that he wasn’t licensed to sell that fund so we would have to call the head office and do it over the phone. (Annoying – but no big deal).  After waiting on hold for a few minutes, the guy from head office said I couldn’t deposit this into the spousal RRSP without speaking to my wife (who wasn’t with me).  I explained I had trading authority and even gave him the password they had set me up with for instances just like this.  Again – he said I couldn’t deposit this into her spousal RRSP without her first reviewing the fund facts as it is a 100% equity fund.  I explained we JUST opened this spousal RRSP a few months prior, she had signed off on the fund facts, it fit her risk profile AND I HAD TRADING AUTHORITY anyway….  Still – it wasn’t good enough for this guy – and finally I had enough/gave up and decided to just deposit it into my RRSP.

***This is where it gets really interesting***

Example 3:

After finally giving up – I told the guy at the bank to just put the funds into my RRSP in one of the funds I already own (Canadian Equity Income Fund).  I watched him type “Canadian Equity Fund”.  I see this and say – “just to confirm this is the equity INCOME fund- not the Equity Fund right?  He assures me – that yes- it will go into the fund I already own.  A few days pass and I log into my online banking only to find I now own $650 of a new fund (Canadian Equity Fund).

Dividends Investing RBC Personal Finance Blog Canada Winnipeg Jordan Maas

 

So now I am on the phone with head office – trying to fix the situation – I just need to  transfer all the funds out of the Canadian Equity fund and into the Canadian Equity Income fund.  To his credit – the guy on the phone was very understanding and did this right away.  So I assumed (BAD IDEA) this guy was competent and could help me with something else.  I decided I wanted to reduce my bi weekly contributions into my RRSP and put the difference into the spousal RRSP instead since my account was quite a bit larger than my wife’s.  I have done this on the phone before – so figured it would be no big deal (BIG MISTAKE).  The guy tells me I can’t increase my contributions into Amber’s account because by doing so it means too high a % of her account will be in equities.  Here is the kicker.  She only has 1 fund which is already 100% equities.  All I was trying to do was to increase the bi weekly contribution to this account.  I tried explaining to this guy that whether you put 1 dollar or 100 dollars into the fund- it is still the EXACT same % …but he somehow couldn’t grasp this.  At this point I am seeing red.  I was ready to lose it.  I tell him forget it – and I am just going to close down all my RBC accounts.

.RBC Dividend Growth Investing INvestment blog winnipeg canada

After a day or two of deciding how I was going to stick it to RBC for Fuckin’ with me – I started thinking about all the things i would need to do to actually make this happen:

  • Get a new bank account
  • Set up Direct deposit with my employer
  • Close out mutual funds, transfer RRSPs, get a new brokerage
  • Cancel all the accounts I just set up for my wife
  • Contact my cell phone, internet, mortgage, insurance companies, and more and get them to switch everything over.

In the end, I decided I really didn’t want to go through all that – hell that would take even more time – and surely I’d become even more frustrated with some of those companies along the way – Plus who is to say a new bank would be any better?

And this is why I believe RBC (or any major Canadian bank) is a great stock to buy.  What other company/industry would I be willing to put up with so much shit – only to end up saying “Awww, fuck it – it’s not THAT bad”.

If that anecdotal evidence isn’t enough to convince you RBC would be a good buy – these results just came in today:

  • RBC reported net income of C$3 billion this quarter ($2.4 billion), up 7 percent.
  • RBC reported net income of C$3 billion this quarter ($2.4 billion), up 7 percent.
  • RBC increased its dividend 3 cents to .94 per quarter
  • After adjustments, Canada’s biggest lender by market capitalization earned $2.05 per diluted share, beating the $1.99 expected by analysts surveyed by Thomson Reuters.

Sorry for the long rant – but I figure if RBC is going to bend us over so much – we may as well at least get them to pay us back in dividends & strong capital gains.

*To my credit – I DID close down all my mutual funds, and move everything to Direct Investing – which will result in me saving about $2000 in fees I would have paid to RBC.

That’ll show em 😛

 

 

 

Personal Finance Blog Update dividends early retirement FIRE Jordan Maas

First monthly update of 2018 & 5 stocks I’m keeping an eye on.

Sweet Jebus…the first month of 2018 is already over & although it went by too fast – I am happy with what was accomplished!

Personal Highlights for January:

  • One of my goals for the year was to take the wife out to dinner at least 5 times, and I am happy to say we were able to get a baby sitter and went to a nice steakhouse earlier this month!
  • I was able to find the time to write 6 new blog posts as well as play with the theme/look of the site.  This will continue to be a work in progress.
  • Added a new section to the website called “My Bar” which although is(slightly off topic) a lot  of fun for me to write about & even more fun making and trying new drinks.
  • Started (finally) watching Last Man On Earth on Netflix and it is GREAT!
  • Had over 1000 visitors to the website in a month for the first time.Personal Finance Blog Winnipeg Canada Investing Dividends Jordan Maas

 

Financial Highlights for January:

I am happy to report that I have already followed through with one of my financial goals for the year – and one that I have wanted to do for some time.

  • Sold my high cost RBC mutual funds and moved them to my direct investing RSP.  Replaced with a lower cost Canadian equity fund & super low cost Global fund. As detailed in this post
  • Started gathering all my statements for tax time 🙂
  • Continued bi weekly payments into RRSPs & Spousal RSP.
  • Increased Spousal RSP amount by $100 bi weekly to try and get our accounts closer in size.
  • Set up an RESP for my kids
  • Got out of the Penny stock/speculation game completely(for good) and made 2 new stock purchases.  You can read more about that HERE.

 

Passive Income Update For January 2018.

TFSA’S:

Diversified Royalty: $9.07 (Dripped 2 new shares)

Canadian Western Bank: $0.24

Artis Reit: $49.86 (Dripped 3 shares)

Plaza Reit: $24.75 (Dripped 5 shares)

Algonquin Power: $110.35 (Dripped 8 shares)

Chorus Aviation: $10.80 (Dripped 1 share)

TFSA’s Total: $205.07

RRSP:

Canadian Equity Income Distribution: $213.99

Total Passive Income January 2018:  $419.06

*The transfer of funds from mutual fund to ETF/Direct investing hasn’t happened as of writing this – even though papers have been signed – so next month will represent the new funds.

Portfolio Update:

My portfolio grew by 1.67% month over month and once again hit an all time!  The early retirement portfolio now sits at $306,396.65.  Dividends grew by $14.95 vs last January (year over year growth of 3.69%).  I expect my dividend growth rate to increase quite a bit more this year once my funds are transferred from my Mutual Funds and into my direct investing account/redeployed.  I am also planning on trying to contribute more into my TFSA this year which should help increase dividends for the year.

I’ve decided to add a new section to the monthly updates, which will be my top 5 stocks I am looking to buy in the future/keeping an eye on:

Current Watch List:

Andrew Peller: ADW

Cascades: CAS

InterRent Reit: IIP

Northview Apartment Reit: NVU

Caledonia Mining: CAL

 

How was your month?

3 Stocks: My Biggest Mistake, My Highest Return(so far) & My Top Pick!

Summer is upon us, and since I’ve been trying to focus on paying down my line of credit & getting my house ready to sell unfortunately my portfolio hasn’t seen too much action.  I thought now would be a good time to do a quick fun post in relation to:

  1. My Worst Ever Stock Pick
  2. My Best Performing Stock Pick (to date)
  3. What I’d buy right now if I had some extra cash aka my “Top Pick”

 

My Worst Ever Stock Pick: TallGrass Energy

My worst stock pick – also happened to be my FIRST stock pick.  I was young and impressionable (also known as an idiot).  I took the advice of an older friend who had a “hot tip”.  At the time I think deep down I knew it was a bad idea but pulled the trigger anyway after doing about 2 minutes of “research” on the company.  I made my first trade that day and spent $1000 on 2600 shares.  Looking back this had all the warning signs:

  • A “hot tip” from a guy with no track record
  • A penny Stock
  • A company I had never heard of
  • Purchase made with zero due diligence done

The company is now bankrupt and my shares are worth nothing.  It was an expensive lesson – but a lesson learned nonetheless.  I keep the 2600 shares in my brokerage account as a reminder to always do my own research and to never listen to any “hot tips”.

My Best Performing Stock(so far): Organigram Holdings

Organigram(OGI) is an East Coast based supplier of medical marijuana.  This company has had some ups and downs this year: losing their organic certification due to pesticides found,(currently in process of getting certification back),  potential class action lawsuit, partnering with the Trailer Park Boys, etc.  This has caused the stock to be extremely volatile (which I expect  to continue until full legalization).

I took my first position in OGI at $0.44.  Today it is trading at $2.22.  (It has traded as high as $4.49) I fully expect it to continue to dip and rally over the next few months.  I bought this stock for the long haul – and I intend to keep it – but it is not for the faint of heart. The stock consistently gains or loses 10-15% of its value in a single trading day.

Although OGI is my best gaining stock (so far) it’s not my favorite stock I own.  Don’t get me wrong – I will continue to hold, and expect more growth – but there are a few others I like a bit better. Over the past 6 months I’ve continued to buy on some of the dips but don’t plan to increase my position as I am happy with the % allocated in my portfolio.

 

My Top Pick: Caledonia Mining

Caledonia is a Mining, Exploration and Development company focused on Southern Africa.  They are one of the lowest cost producers in the world and as long as you can stomach the fact that they operate in Zimbabwe, and that volume is fairly thinly traded* all their operating metrics look great:

*Currently in plans to trade on the NYSE which should increase volume*

  • The company pays a healthy dividend which it increased in July 2016
  • EPS: 0.26
  • P/E Ratio: 6.6
  • 18% increase in gold production year over year
  • -9% decrease in cost per ounce to produce
  • +98% increased Net Profit year over year

Caledonia has paid consistent dividends since 2014 and is covered 2.9 times by earnings & 7.7 times by operating cash flow.  They are on track to produce 80,000 ounces by 2021(to put that growth into perspective they produced 50,351 in 2016).

I plan to update my “top pick” at least once a year – as well as look back on them and see how they performed.

Do you have any Worst, Best Or Top Picks? If so – I’d love to hear about them.