I have had an RBC bank account since I was about 8 years old.  My parents signed me up with the Leo Lion Savings account.  I will be turning 35 this year – and have added the following RBC products over the years:

  • RBC Visa
  • RBC Mutual Funds
  • RBC Line of Credit
  • TFSA Via RBA
  • Direct Investing
  • RESP
  • Spousal RSP
  • Joint Account with Wife

In the last 12 months, RBC has fucked me over more times than I can count.  Here are a few examples:

Example 1:
I had a $40,000 line of credit with a very good interest rate.  I usually didn’t carry a balance on this – however every now and then I would use it to invest if there was a stock I really wanted to buy – but didn’t have the cash on hand.  When we recently purchased our new house – the lender giving us the mortgage wanted us to pay off the line of credit before approving us- so my lawyer sent a letter & Cheque to RBC saying part of the proceeds of my house sale should pay down the L.O.C to zero.  RBC not only paid off the Line of Credit – they also closed it altogether (without telling me).  To make matters worse, at my next appointment RBC told me they had a special offer for me.  Can you guess what it was?  A $10,000 line of credit with a higher interest rate.

Example 2:

I had previously set up opened a Direct Investing Account for my wife as well as a TFSA & Spousal RRSP.  I made sure to ensure I had trading authority on her accounts (as she has no interest in any of this).  I recently redeemed some of my RBC rewards for $650 that I could deposit into a RRSP.   I set up an appointment at the branch to make the deposit into my spousal RRSP.  The guy at the branch said no problem – but that he wasn’t licensed to sell that fund so we would have to call the head office and do it over the phone. (Annoying – but no big deal).  After waiting on hold for a few minutes, the guy from head office said I couldn’t deposit this into the spousal RRSP without speaking to my wife (who wasn’t with me).  I explained I had trading authority and even gave him the password they had set me up with for instances just like this.  Again – he said I couldn’t deposit this into her spousal RRSP without her first reviewing the fund facts as it is a 100% equity fund.  I explained we JUST opened this spousal RRSP a few months prior, she had signed off on the fund facts, it fit her risk profile AND I HAD TRADING AUTHORITY anyway….  Still – it wasn’t good enough for this guy – and finally I had enough/gave up and decided to just deposit it into my RRSP.

***This is where it gets really interesting***

Example 3:

After finally giving up – I told the guy at the bank to just put the funds into my RRSP in one of the funds I already own (Canadian Equity Income Fund).  I watched him type “Canadian Equity Fund”.  I see this and say – “just to confirm this is the equity INCOME fund- not the Equity Fund right?  He assures me – that yes- it will go into the fund I already own.  A few days pass and I log into my online banking only to find I now own $650 of a new fund (Canadian Equity Fund).

Dividends Investing RBC Personal Finance Blog Canada Winnipeg Jordan Maas

 

So now I am on the phone with head office – trying to fix the situation – I just need to  transfer all the funds out of the Canadian Equity fund and into the Canadian Equity Income fund.  To his credit – the guy on the phone was very understanding and did this right away.  So I assumed (BAD IDEA) this guy was competent and could help me with something else.  I decided I wanted to reduce my bi weekly contributions into my RRSP and put the difference into the spousal RRSP instead since my account was quite a bit larger than my wife’s.  I have done this on the phone before – so figured it would be no big deal (BIG MISTAKE).  The guy tells me I can’t increase my contributions into Amber’s account because by doing so it means too high a % of her account will be in equities.  Here is the kicker.  She only has 1 fund which is already 100% equities.  All I was trying to do was to increase the bi weekly contribution to this account.  I tried explaining to this guy that whether you put 1 dollar or 100 dollars into the fund- it is still the EXACT same % …but he somehow couldn’t grasp this.  At this point I am seeing red.  I was ready to lose it.  I tell him forget it – and I am just going to close down all my RBC accounts.

.RBC Dividend Growth Investing INvestment blog winnipeg canada

After a day or two of deciding how I was going to stick it to RBC for Fuckin’ with me – I started thinking about all the things i would need to do to actually make this happen:

  • Get a new bank account
  • Set up Direct deposit with my employer
  • Close out mutual funds, transfer RRSPs, get a new brokerage
  • Cancel all the accounts I just set up for my wife
  • Contact my cell phone, internet, mortgage, insurance companies, and more and get them to switch everything over.

In the end, I decided I really didn’t want to go through all that – hell that would take even more time – and surely I’d become even more frustrated with some of those companies along the way – Plus who is to say a new bank would be any better?

And this is why I believe RBC (or any major Canadian bank) is a great stock to buy.  What other company/industry would I be willing to put up with so much shit – only to end up saying “Awww, fuck it – it’s not THAT bad”.

If that anecdotal evidence isn’t enough to convince you RBC would be a good buy – these results just came in today:

  • RBC reported net income of C$3 billion this quarter ($2.4 billion), up 7 percent.
  • RBC reported net income of C$3 billion this quarter ($2.4 billion), up 7 percent.
  • RBC increased its dividend 3 cents to .94 per quarter
  • After adjustments, Canada’s biggest lender by market capitalization earned $2.05 per diluted share, beating the $1.99 expected by analysts surveyed by Thomson Reuters.

Sorry for the long rant – but I figure if RBC is going to bend us over so much – we may as well at least get them to pay us back in dividends & strong capital gains.

*To my credit – I DID close down all my mutual funds, and move everything to Direct Investing – which will result in me saving about $2000 in fees I would have paid to RBC.

That’ll show em 😛

 

 

 

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